What is your Recruitment Go-To-Market strategy?!

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After spending years in the service of Job Descriptions – one cant help but notice the unifying theme of their distillation. They are all too often an amalgam of flat generalizations paired with archaic marketing copy without a hint of an individual’s true role and responsibilities. One of the most overlooked aspects of any enterprise recruitment initiative is a compelling and engaging Go-To-Market strategy that speaks to a candidate’s drives on a personal and professional level and as is the case the Job Description is often at the front-line.

Doug & Polly White over at Entrepreneur pump up the Job Description as a potential platform in support of orientation, training, compensation modeling and expectation management.

6 Benefits of Writing Job Descriptions for Your Business

Doug & Polly White No law requires business owners to have written job descriptions for the positions in their companies. They take time to write — and time is precious for businesses.

On the other hand, job descriptions can be very useful. Job descriptions are the result of analysis — the process of identifying and determining the particular duties and requirements and the relative importance of these duties for a given position. Once you have determined the duties and requirements you can write a job description, but you can also use the document to:

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Recruiting Wasn’t Broken Until You Came Along.

Matt Charney doing what Matt Charney does best, providing the pork sans lipstick. “Recruiting might be broken, but it’s up to recruiters to fix it – and there’s no tool or technology on earth that can actually do it for you.” If you are not onboard you might want to consider it, because the ship is heading back to port.

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Every day, I’m lucky enough to get to talk to the people on the cutting edge of the recruiting technology industry; most of these are entrepreneurs who share a passion for their mostly cookie cutter products and the belief that, somehow, they’re going to help fix recruiting, which every single one seems to think is either “broken” or “a problem.”

The problem, at least as I see it, is actually entirely the creation of these companies looking to create a market for solutions and, in doing so, adding unnecessary layers of complexity to something that’s pretty straightforward and simple. Recruiting isn’t that hard.

If you know how to source, how to soft sell a candidate in the guise of a screen and how to present and package those candidates to hiring managers, you can fill a position with or without social, mobile, big data or automated matching algorithms.

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What Was that Word Again? Reciprocity? Ahh, That’s it! How to fill your dance card the right way!

Dorie Clark over at HBR points out some of the more nuanced elements of best practices associated with “transactional networking” in an effort to make these meetings mutually beneficial by moving the agenda into more forthright territory.

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The Right (and Wrong) Way to Network

– Dorrie Clark March 10, 2015

Some people line up lunches and coffee dates because they’re in search of a job, venture funding, or clients for their company. But if that’s the reason you’re having a networking meeting, you — and your invitee — aren’t likely to get much satisfaction. As Harvard Business School professor Francesca Gino and her colleagues have noted, “transactional networking” — i.e., “networking with the goal of advancement” — often makes participants feel so bad about themselves, they feel “dirty.”

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How Do You Handle Those Difficult Conversations at Work?!

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I don’t know about you, but I have always taken the Band-Aid approach to those dreaded talks that unenviably arise when working in close quarters with clients, peers, and subordinates.  Freelance journalist Rebecca Knight takes a more thoughtful path when devising the right way to approach these sensitive dialogues. Hopefully you can glean some insight and save yourself undue anxiety.  

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Sourcing is a Capital Investment

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A Great read from Shally Steckler, President of The Sourcing Institute on the diminishing role of broadcast recruiting, the growing sophistication of potential candidates and the ways and means necessary to engage them via Sourcing!

Rumor has it that job boards are diminishing in relevance and becoming less effective hiring tools with each passing day. Experts love flogging this subject to draw attention to themselves; some going as far as predicting job boards will soon be obsolete, others touting panaceas promising to be the final answer to everyone’s recruitment woes. Check it out:

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Q: So, What do you do? A: …

Marc Cowling does a great job of explaining some simple steps to avoid the pratfalls of gobsmacking the poor sods who inquire about your vocation or how I learned to stop sounding like a jerk when people ask me what I do.

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5 Tips for Explaining Your Job Description to Your In-laws | How to Not Fail (like me)

-Marc Cowling,  August 21, 2014

We’re supposed to admit when we fail, right? And we’re supposed to learn something when we fail, right? This past weekend, when my Father In-law (FIL) asked about what I do for a living, I opened my mouth, started talking, and realized I might need some time to think. I felt as though I needed a few props, perhaps a script and more coffee before I got too far into my description. In the end, I failed at explaining my job. I’m hoping my failure will help you to prep for a similar conversation.

I hope you never feel the job description failure pain I felt.

Oh, so painful.

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On The Importance Of Emotions in Negotiations

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Shirli Kopelman speaks with great insight about her time studying the role of  emotions in negotiating in a recent article titled “Make Your Emotions Work for You in Negotiations“.

The importance of emotions and the role that they play in a successful negotiation cannot be stress enough. Shirli, points out in a rather matter of fact fashion, that the root cause of emotions MUST be acknowledged and assessed in a strategic manner rather than being oppressed and managed away.

in my two decades of research and work with thousands of executives, I’ve found that emotions shouldn’t be managed or overcome. Rather, positive and negative emotions are valuable resources that you can use to your advantage. The key is to recognize during the negotiation what emotion you’re feeling, then quickly evaluate whether it will help or hinder you, and without taking a break, intensify or decrease the feeling, or in some cases change the emotion altogether.” – Shirli Kopelman

She has gone so far as to lay out a five-step road map to more productively engage your emotions during negotiations:

Step 1: Be mindful.

Step 2: Identify your emotional trigger and focus on something else.

Step 3: Reinterpret the trigger.

Step 4: Alter the emotion by changing its physiological expression

Step 5: Take action that others will see.

Read the full details over here!